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<< February 2015 >>
S M T W T F S
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Current Campaigns
  • This web page provides information on our fight against fast-track legislation. The measure requires Congress to take only a quick up-or-down vote on secret trade deals like the Trans-Pacific Partnership and does not allow such agreements to be amended. It limits Congress’ constitutionally mandated oversight of such trade deals and lets others decide what’s best for America. The result is fewer good-paying U.S. jobs and unsafe food and products for Americans. Read more to find out why fast track is the wrong track for Teamsters and America.

  • First Student employees’ collective bargaining agreement with the company, which covers more than 21,000 workers, expires on March 31, 2015. Employees at First Student made history when they voted overwhelmingly to ratify a national master agreement on June 1, 2011, and it is time to renegotiate that agreement. Turn to this page to get the latest contract news and updates. The first round of negotiations is scheduled for January 27-28, 2015. The national contract expires March 31, 2015.

  • At the Hunt’s Point Produce Terminal in the Bronx, 1,300 members of Teamsters Local 202 have been working under harsh conditions without a raise several times since the recession. They are asking management for a fair wage – a pay hike of $25 a week. Management is refusing and the workers voted to authorize a strike at 4 p.m. on Jan 18. The workers who feed New York should be able to feed their families.

  • Teamsters are standing together to protect good jobs as Sysco, the country’s largest foodservice provider, attempts to purchase its only national competitor, US Foods. Join our campaign to demand that Sysco and US Foods honor their agreements with 11,500 Teamsters and protect the livelihoods of the men and women who make these companies leaders in the industry. LIKE our Facebook page, here.

  • Taylor Farms workers in Tracy, California are standing up against poverty wages, disrespect and severe violations of their most basic rights. These 900 food processing workers in the Central Valley cut, wash and package salads and other products for the largest supplier of fresh-cut produce in the country. They feed the customers of major grocers, retailers and restaurant chains, including Walmart and McDonald’s.

    With a revenue of $1.8 billion in 2012, Taylor Farms can afford to treat its workers in Tracy with dignity and pay fair wages, just like their Teamster coworkers have at Taylor Farms’ facilities in Salinas, California. But when workers came together to organize with Teamsters Local 601, the company responded mercilessly. It fired, harassed, and punished workers for supporting the union. The company threatened immigrant workers with deportation, hiring an army of union-busters to run a non-stop fear campaign. During an NLRB election for union representation, Taylor Farms deployed a goon squad of supervisors to intimidate workers. The company’s violations were so egregious that the Labor Board impounded ballots while it investigates hundreds of Unfair Labor Practice charges.

    Workers in Tracy, following in the footsteps of labor leader and civil rights icon Cesar Chavez, are taking their fight to the public. The workers’ struggle for a better life for their families is supported by Teamsters in California and nationwide. We are building a movement for respect for the workers who feed America.

    ¡Si Se Puede!

  • Taxi drivers in Washington, D.C. are fed up!

    After years of unfair regulations and lack of respect, we are fighting back by forming the Washington, D.C. Taxi Operators Association. Our association will be backed by Teamsters Local 922 and the 1.4 million-member International Brotherhood of Teamsters.

  • The Teamsters have stood in solidarity with worker struggles in other countries since our founding. With economic globalization, our ability to organize increasingly depends on our ability to build alliances with workers on a global scale.
    More than ever, Teamsters are organizing and bargaining with multi-national companies. A key objective of our Global Strategies Campaign is to build strong alliances with unions around the globe who organize and bargain with common employers. Our focus is on workers in the emerging global supply chains – the infrastructure of globalization.
    Globalization creates new opportunities for international worker solidarity. We seek common cause with workers around the world to build social justice for all workers and the communities in which they live.

  • Teamsters at Republic Services/Allied Waste have stood together in recent years to fight for strong contracts, including going on strike and supporting their fellow striking workers. Workers continue to fight for strong contracts that include retirement security at the second largest solid waste company. This campaign page is dedicated to those ongoing efforts.

  • Welcome to Teamster Organizing!

    You've heard it said that the best defense is a good offense. In the war on workers, Teamster Organizing is on the offensive! We're winning power for workers across industries and across North America. Join us!

Teamster News Headlines
http://teamster.org/news/headline-news
UNION STRONG

Visit Unions-America.com!

SHARE YOUR GOOD IDEAS

WE KNOW YOU ARE SMART!

So, you if have a great Idea?

Or a good suggestion.....

Share it with your Union.

513-769-5100

 

Front row (left to right): Danny Smith (Big G Express, Inc.); Henry Bruster (UPS Freight); Eric Ramsdell (Walmart Transportation); Richie Buitrago (Con-way Freight); Neil Kirk (Penske Logistics). Second row: Charles Demchock II (Walmart Transportation); Derrick Whittle (Cargo Transporters, Inc.); Paul Savill (UPS Freight); David Green (Werner Enterprises); Kirk Weis (ABF Freight System, Inc.); Bill West (ABF Freight System, Inc.). Third row: Russell Simpson (Holland, Inc.); Chad Miller (ABF Freight System, Inc.); Scott Woodrome (FedEx Freight); Randall Luschen (Weinrich Truck Line Inc.); John McKown (UPS Freight); Eric Flick (FedEx Freight); Tim Vogt (Con-way Freight); Bill Minor (Con-way Freight).

Teamsters Local 100 can be proud to announce that Local 100 member Mr. Paul Savil, a driver at UPS Freight in Cincinnati has been selected to serve as a Road Team Captain for the Volvo- ATA Road Team in 2015.

By Michael G. Malloy, Staff Reporter

This story appears in the Jan. 19 print edition of Transport Topics.

American Trucking Associations last week named 19 truck drivers to represent the industry as the 2015-2016 America’s Road Team.

The drivers, who will serve as Road Team captains for two years, were selected from 31 finalists.

The new captains have 453 combined years of experience and have logged more than 30 million accident-free miles.

They competed before a panel of judges near ATA’s Arlington, Virginia, headquarters.

The competition tested drivers’ knowledge of the trucking industry, communication skills, and reviewed their community service and safety records.

During their terms, the captains will represent the trucking industry at events nationwide.

"America’s Road Team represents the best of what trucking can be: dedication to safety, professionalism and pride in an industry that delivers life’s essentials every day," ATA President Bill Graves said.

"These 19 outstanding professionals join a select fraternity," he added. "America’s Road Team has delivered the message of safety to millions, and I’m proud that these individuals will now be representing our industry."

At a Jan. 14 presentation ceremony, ATA Chairman Duane Long called the incoming class "ambassadors for life," and asked them to be role models to bring more young people into the trucking business.

"Safety will be the biggest topic you talk about, but I hope that when you meet young people, you will think about how to inspire them to come into this great industry," said Long, who also is chairman of Raleigh, North Carolina-based Longistics.

Some of the younger new captains said they hope to get out a message that driving a truck is a stable and professional job for young people to consider.

"A lot of old stereotypes are what people still think of trucking," said Tim Vogt, 36, who started driving for Con-way Freight at 21. Young people "might want to get into a corporate job, but this is a corporate job. It has all the benefits and all the opportunities."

UPS Freight’s Henry Bruster, 38, began driving trucks in the Army at 18 and started driving professionally at 22 after taking a CDL class.

"When I started, some of the older drivers were my role models," said Bruster, who been driving for UPS for 15 years. "Now the younger drivers look up to me."

Bill Minor, 40, also with Con-way Freight, is a fourth-generation truck driver and said his 7-year-old son already has expressed interest in becoming a trucker.

"You’ll always be in demand" as a driver, he added. "If something happens with your company, you go next door and say ‘I have a CDL and a good driving record,’ and they’ll put you to work." He also started driving at 21.

"We’re the new face of the trucking industry," added Ricardo Buitrago, a driver with Con-way Freight in Kissimmee, Florida. "Our goal is to come home every night safely along with those who share the road with us."

America’s Road Team, which began in 1986, has been sponsored by Volvo Trucks since 2002.

"We are proud to congratulate and support the top-notch professional drivers who have been selected as captains of the 2015-2016 America’s Road Team," said Göran Nyberg, president of Volvo Trucks’ North American sales and marketing.

Volvo was scheduled to present the team with a new 2016 VNL 780 truck late last week at its New River Valley manufacturing plant in Dublin, Virginia.

Road Team captains will take turns traveling around the country with the truck for the next two years, talking about safety at community events and schools, and to the news media, public officials and fellow truck drivers. Captains’ fleet employers pay their salaries while they are on the road.

David Green is among the new Road Team members to benefit. As a driver for truckload carrier Werner Enterprises, he "embodies everything that’s positive within the industry," said Jaime Maus, Werner’s vice president of safety and compliance.

"They’re great ambassadors for the industry," said less-than-truckload carrier Holland Inc.’s Stephen Blubaugh, vice president of human resources. Holland driver Russell Simpson is a new captain.

"They’re professional in every way, and as an industry we need people to understand what a truck driver is," Blubaugh added.

The 2015-2016 America’s Road Team captains are:

• Henry Bruster, UPS Freight, Woodville, Miss.

• Ricardo Buitrago, Con-way Freight, Kissimmee, Fla.

• Charles Demchock II, Wal-Mart Transportation, Cocoa, Fla.

• Eric Flick, FedEx Freight, Dayton, Nev.

• David Green, Werner Enterprises, Hot Springs, Ark.

• Neil Kirk, Penske Logistics, Middletown, N.Y.

• Randall Luschen, Weinrich Truck Line Inc., Merrill, Iowa

• John McKown, UPS Freight, East Berlin, Pa.

• Chad Miller, ABF Freight System Inc., Crown Point, Ind.

• Bill Minor, Con-way Freight, West Milwaukee, Wis.

• Eric Ramsdell, Wal-Mart Transportation, Wittmann, Ariz.

• Paul Savill, UPS Freight, Hamilton, Ohio

• Russell Simpson, Holland Inc., South Vienna, Ohio

• Danny Smith, Big G Express Inc., Shelbyville, Tenn.

• Tim Vogt, Con-way Freight, Loganville, Ga.

• Kirk Weis, ABF Freight System Inc., Rio Rancho, N.M.

• William West, ABF Freight System Inc., Roopville, Ga.

• Derrick Whittle, Cargo Transporters Inc., Fieldale, Va.

• Scott Woodrome, FedEx Freight, Middletown, Ohio

The Next

Membership Meetings

will be

February 3rd, 2015

at 7 PM


 

 

 

This Week in Labor History

January 26
In what could be considered the first workers’ compensation agreement in America, pirate Henry Morgan pledges his underlings 600 pieces of eight or six slaves to compensate for a lost arm or leg. Also part of the pirate’s code, reports Roger Newell: shares of the booty were equal regardless of race or sex, and shipboard decisions were made collectively - 1695

Samuel Gompers, first AFL president, born in London, England. He emigrated to the U.S. as a youth - 1850

The Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America is chartered by the American Federation of Labor to organize "every wage earner from the man who takes the bullock at the house until it goes into the hands of the consumer." - 1897

Workers win a two-day sit-down strike at the Brooklyn electric plant that powers the city's entire subway system - 1937

A handful of American companies announce nearly 60,000 layoffs today, as the recession that began during the George W. Bush presidency charges full-tilt toward what became known as the Great Recession - 2009
(Union Strategies for Hard Times, 2nd Edition: What can unions do as the fallout of the Great Recession continues to ravage workers and their unions and threatens to destroy decades of collective bargaining gains? What must local union leaders do to help their laid off members, protect those still working, and prevent the gutting of their hard-fought contracts—and their very unions themselves? 
    Bill Barry, until recently director of labor studies at the Community College of Baltimore County and a 40-year veteran of the movement, calls on his long history of activism and years of "what works, what doesn’t" discussions with other leaders to come up with a plan to survive these terrible times and even use crisis to build a better future.)


January 27
New York City maids organize to improve working conditions - 1734

Mine explosion in Mount Pleasant, Pa., leaves more than 100 dead - 1891

First meeting of the Int’l Labor Organization (ILO) - 1920

Kansas miners strike against compulsory arbitration - 1920

A 3¢ postage stamp is issued, honoring AFL founder Samuel Gompers - 1950
(There is Power in a Union: The Epic Story of Labor in America is the sympathetic, thoughtful and highly readable history of the American labor movement traces unionism from the textile mills of Lowell, Massachusetts in the 1820s to organized labor’s decline in the 1980s and struggle for survival and growth today.)


A group of Detroit African-American auto workers known as the Eldon Avenue Axle Plant Revolutionary Union Movement leads a wildcat strike against racism and bad working conditions.  They are critical of both automakers and the UAW, condemning the seniority system and grievance procedures as racist – 1969

Pete Seeger dies in New York at age 94. A musician and activist, he was a revered figure on the American left, persecuted during the McCarthy era for his support of  progressive, labor and civil rights causes. A prolific songwriter, he is generally credited with popularizing the civil rights anthem “We Shall Overcome.” He actively participated in demonstrations until shortly before his death - 2014

Members of the Northwestern University football team announce they are seeking union recognition. A majority signed cards, later delivered to the National Labor Relations Board office in Chicago, asking for representation by the College Athletes Players Association - 2014

January 28
American Miners’ Association formed - 1861

First U.S. unemployment compensation law enacted, in Wisconsin - 1932

January 29
Responding to unrest among Irish laborers building the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, President Andrew Jackson orders first use of American troops to suppress a labor dispute - 1834

Six thousand railway workers strike for a union and the end of 18-hour day - 1889

Sit-down strike helps establish United Rubber Workers as a national union, Akron, Ohio - 1936

American Train Dispatchers Department granted a charter by the AFL-CIO - 1957

Dolly Parton hits number one on the record charts with "9 to 5," her anthem to the daily grind - 1981

Newly-elected President Barack Obama signs the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, making it easier for women and minorities to win pay discrimination suits - 2009

January 30
Franklin Delano Roosevelt is born in Hyde Park, N.Y. He was elected president of the United States four times starting in 1933. His New Deal programs helped America survive the Great Depression. His legislative achievements included the creation of the National Labor Relations Act, which allows workers to organize unions, bargain collectively, and strike - 1882

January 31
Some 12,000 pecan shellers in San Antonio, Texas—mostly Latino women—walk off their jobs at 400 factories in what was to become a three-month strike against wage cuts.  Strike leader Emma Tenayuca was eventually hounded out of the state - 1938

Ida M. Fuller is the first retiree to receive an old-age monthly benefit check under the new Social Security law. She paid in $24.75 between 1937 and 1939 on an income of $2,484; her first check was for $22.54 - 1940

After scoring successes with representation elections conducted under the protective oversight of the California Agricultural Labor Relations Board, the United Farm Workers of America officially ends its historic table grape, lettuce and wine boycotts - 1978
(The Fight in the Fields tells of legendary United Farm Workers of America founder and leader Cesar Chavez and his union’s struggles: to raise farmworker pay from .40 an hour; to win union recognition from savagely resistant grape and lettuce growers; to stop the use of deadly pesticides that were killing children in the fields. The pacifist Chavez endured several month-long fasts to counteract what he saw as a growing tendency toward violence in the farmworker movement, and many think those heroic acts contributed to his early death, at the age of 64.)

Union and student pressure forces Harvard University to adopt new labor policies raising wages for lowest-paid workers - 2002

Five months after Hurricane Katrina, the New Orleans school board fires every teacher in the district in what the United Teachers of New Orleans sees as an effort to break the union and privatize the school system - 2005

February 01
Led by 23-year-old Kate Mullaney, the Collar Laundry Union forms in Troy, N.Y., and raises earnings for female laundry workers from $2 to $14 a week - 1864

Bricklayers begin working 8-hour days - 1867

Some 25,000 Paterson, N.J., silk workers strike for 8-hour work day and improved working conditions. Eighteen hundred were arrested over the course of the six-month walkout, led by the Wobblies.  They returned to work on their employers’ terms - 1913

The federal minimum wage increases to $1.60 per hour - 1968

Int’l Brotherhood of Firemen & Oilers merge with Service Employees Int’l Union - 1995
—Compiled and edited by David Prosten
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Martin Luther King, Jr.

I Have a Dream

delivered 28 August 1963, at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington D.C.

I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languished in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. And so we've come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.

In a sense we've come to our nation's capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the "unalienable Rights" of "Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness." It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note, insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked "insufficient funds."

But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. And so, we've come to cash this check, a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice.

We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of Now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God's children.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro's legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. And those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. And there will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people, who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice: In the process of gaining our rightful place, we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again, we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force.

The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. And they have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom.

We cannot walk alone.

And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead.

We cannot turn back.

There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, "When will you be satisfied?" We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the negro's basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as our children are stripped of their self-hood and robbed of their dignity by signs stating: "For Whites Only." We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until "justice rolls down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream."¹

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. And some of you have come from areas where your quest -- quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive. Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed.

Let us not wallow in the valley of despair, I say to you today, my friends.

And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal."

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of "interposition" and "nullification" -- one day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, and every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight; "and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together."2

This is our hope, and this is the faith that I go back to the South with.

With this faith, we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith, we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith, we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

And this will be the day -- this will be the day when all of God's children will be able to sing with new meaning:

My country 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing.
Land where my fathers died, land of the Pilgrim's pride,
From every mountainside, let freedom ring!

And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true.

And so let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire.

Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York.

Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania.
Let freedom ring from the snow-capped Rockies of Colorado.
Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California.

But not only that:

Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia.
Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee.
Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi.
From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

And when this happens, and when we allow freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual:

Free at last! Free at last!

Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!3

JRH Scholarship

About James R. Hoffa Memorial Scholarship Fund

Welcome to the James R. Hoffa Memorial Scholarship Fund Information Center, your one-stop shop for information, policy, procedures and forms.

James R. Hoffa became a Teamster member in 1934 and served as General President for 14 years, and, in recognition of his tireless service to the union and its members, was honored as General President Emeritus for life. At the November 1999 General Executive Board meeting, then-General Secretary-Treasurer C. Thomas Keegel presented a resolution to establish the new scholarship fund. This site describes the James R. Hoffa Memorial Scholarship Fund (JRHMSF) and outlines eligibility requirements and application procedures.

The James R. Hoffa Memorial Scholarship Fund is an independent organization established and registered as a tax-exempt entity under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. The Fund is established solely to provide scholarships to the child or dependent of a member of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, and contributions to the Fund are deductible as charitable contributions to the extent permitted by law.    In 2015 the Fund plans to award $1,000,000 in scholarships.

Please click here to access the Application and Academic Record Forms

*The application deadline for the  2015/2016 college scholarship is March 31, 2015.

The Thirteenth Annual "Drive for Education" Golf Tournament and Ninth Annual "Texas Hold'Em" Poker Tournament will be held this year from May 11-13, 2015.  Please click here to see registration forms and to register on-line.

Special thanks to our Major Sponsors, Joint Councils and Locals who have made the James R. Hoffa Memorial Scholarship Fund events possible.  We salute you on our 16th Anniversary!

AETNA

Northern Trust Global Investment

American Income Life/NILICO and United American Insurance Company

OptumRX

Blue Cross Blue Shield Associations

Prudential Financial

BNY Mellon Asset Management

Teamsters Joint Council 25

Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employes Division

Teamsters Joint Council 41

Community Financial Service Association

Teamsters Local Union 817

ENTRUST Capital, Inc.

Teamsters Local Union 986

Grand Fund LLC

The UPS Foundation

INVESCO

Vision Service Plan

McMorgan and Company

Yucaipa Companies

There have been some problems with Teamsters

losing health benefits and prescription benefits

while filing for disability and /or workers compensation.   

There is no worse time to lose you health benefits

and prescription benefits than while a member is injured or ill. 

We have been working to resolve this problem.

Welcome UPS

We have been in contact with the Teamcare people

to correct this problem.    

The attached link is a pdf version of the instructions:

http://www.teamsterslocal100.com/docs/contracts/STD_Procedures_and_Claim_Form_Combined___FINAL.pdf

These instructions outline the new procedures

to maintain benefits while filing for disability

or filing for workers compensation.   

(When filing for Workers Compensation,

you will also need to file a subrugation agreement,

agreeing to re-pay Teamcare if and when your worker's

compensation claim is approved.)

Since changing from UPS sponsored disability benefits to

Teamcare disability benefits, the procedures have changed. 

With the changes some of our brothers and sisters

have been denied disability benefits

and have been denied health benefits

and prescription benefits. 

Hopefully with these new procedures,

we have addressed these problems.

If you have any questions or issues with obtaining benefits,

please call Dave Webster, 513-769-5100 ext 319

or Sam Bucalo, 513-769-5100 ext 317

http://www.teamsterslocal100.com/docs/contracts/STD_Procedures_and_Claim_Form_Combined___FINAL.pdf

A Labor Day Message from

Teamsters General President James P. Hoffa

On the first Monday of every September, our nation honors the contributions and sacrifices of millions of working men and women. Labor Day is about remembering labor’s triumphs and the workers without whom society would not function. But it’s also about solidarity and celebrating our movement—a movement that today is alive and well and still fighting for a strong middle class.

The labor movement, and the Teamsters Union in particular, is alive and well and is still forcing change. Labor is behind the movement to raise the minimum wage and shining a spotlight on income inequality. And the Teamsters Union is still organizing new members. Many workers know that unions are the key to a better life, and Labor Day is a time to remind everyone else about that fact. That’s why the Teamsters Union has organized more than 40,000 school bus workers in the last few years; why nearly 600 paratransit drivers in Chicago and hundreds more parking workers in Boston just joined the Teamsters; why thousands of taxi drivers nationwide are forming associations with the Teamsters.

For far too many people, Labor Day is seen simply as a day of rest. But for a growing set of U.S. workers, there is no break from trying to earn enough to support their families. Despite a dip in unemployment during the past few years, low pay continues to plague many employees while their corporate bosses rake in record profits.

The roots of the American middle class' economic decline are decades in the making. Spurred by a decline in union membership, fewer manufacturing jobs and an increase in the service economy, it has gotten harder and harder for workers to make ends meet. And those changes have been exacerbated by trade deals like NAFTA that have led to more than a million lost jobs.

Improving the outlook for U.S workers isn't about creating millions of minimum-wage jobs. It is about creating sustainable, skilled employment that allows Americans to earn a fair wage with benefits that allows them to pay for housing and food on the table and sustain a middle-class lifestyle.

Corporations are increasingly looking to friendly lawmakers on the Hill who are only too happy to reduce the "burden" on billionaires while rank-and-file workers suffer. Despite being a nation that gave birth to the epic failed energy conglomerate Enron Corp. and mega-banks that drove the U.S. into a recession and threaten to do so again, for too many in Congress, there is no limit to obstacles they will hurdle for their corporate cronies.

Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for the average worker. That's why we have tobacco field workers living in squalor and getting sick and injured while working for the minimum wage in North Carolina. That's why we have fast-food workers who are victimized by successful companies allegedly stealing their wages. And it is why we have thousands of low-wage workers taking to the streets over and over again to say enough.

Hardworking Americans find themselves at a crossroads. With the November elections looming, they need to carefully consider their options to help turn the U.S. economy in a positive direction. It starts with backing candidates who place the people above the powerful.

 

It's Labor Day weekend, an opportunity for workers to relax, reflect and take pride in our accomplishments and the knowledge that we have changed our country for the better.

But it’s also a time for us to pledge our support for our brothers and sisters who are fighting tooth and nail every day just to get by, who are languishing without the good jobs and fair wages they need to support their families. In this country, someone working the minimum wage makes $290 a week. You and I both know that’s not enough to feed a family and keep a home warm in winter, let alone be able to buy your kids back-to-school supplies.

This weekend is Labor Day weekend, but Election Day is coming. We’ve got a big fight on our hands now, a fight that will determine whether workers continue to struggle or whether we can revitalize our communities that have been devastated by big banks and corporate greed.

Will we elect officials who’ll raise wages and create jobs or ones who’ll give more tax breaks to corporations and CEOs and leave workers behind?

We need to raise the standard of living in this country. We need to raise workers’ share of the fruits of our own labor because it’s not right that CEOs are the only ones profiting from our sweat. We need to raise the number of kids who go to college and the number of seniors who retire in security and comfort. We need to raise our voices. We need to roll up our sleeves and fight.

It starts with raising the minimum wage. It ends with an economy that works for everyone, not just corporations and CEOs.

It starts this weekend. It ends on Election Day, with victories for elected officials who will fight for working people every single day they're in office.

Will you join me, brothers and sisters? To fight not just for ourselves, but for all working families—and for the future of the country we love?

It’s going to be a tough fight, but you and I have never shied away from one of those before, not when workers’ lives are on the line. Let’s stand together and win this one in November.

(copied from an AFL-CIO letter sent to union leaders this weekend)



old union hall

TEAMSTERS LOCAL 100

SUPPORTS THE

MEMBERS

OF THE BUTLER COUNTY

CHILDREN'S SERVICES

INDEPENDENT UNION.

Below is a notice sent by email this weekend

from the City of Cincinnati

Human Resources Department:

Just wanted to provide an update on the retro mass pay increase.

As you are aware, AFSCME, CODE, and Teamsters employees

received a 1.5% COLA that was implemented this pay period.

The effective date for CODE was 7/7/2013, for AFSCME it was 8/18/2013,

and for Teamsters it was 10/27/2013.

Retroactive pay was also calculated and paid using those dates.

For the retro pay, employees will see either RET,
which designates pensionable earnings,
or REN is used for non-pensionable earnings.
REN applies to overtime and is also used for any retro paid
to any employee who terminated employment prior to August 3,2014.
Some employees were temporarily promoted during this period and their
retro may not have calculated correctly if they were temporarily promoted to
a non-represented position or if they moved between D0 and D0C. 
HR is currently working to identify those individuals to ensure that the retro
calculated correctly and to correct, as needed.
HR Liaisions were advised last week to notify Lisa Berning of the employee's
name and CHRIS ID number and the Divisions affected.
We will make every effort to correct any identified errors
as quickly as possible.
Lisa Berning is te HR contact for the technical aspect of the pay increase.
Thanks very much.
For Teamster Workers at the GCWW, our next scheduled raise is
October 27, 2014. 
We have 1% raise, which is tied to all other City Bargaining Units. 
We included a "Me Too" clause, where if any other City Employees
receive a larger wage increse (larger than 1%),
we will rexceive that larger wage increase.
This year both the Firefighters Union and the Police Union
are in contract negotiations.
Neither of these groups,
representing more than 1700 City Employees,
have received a raise in about six years.

The New UPS Contract Books are HERE! 

Ask your steward or your business agent

to bring some into your work area.

Cheers to the UPS team for installing this ramp

this week for an elderly client in KY! #UPS

THE NEW UPS CONTRACT

HAS BEEN RELEASED IN PDF VERSION.  

LOCAL 100 HAS ORDERED PRINTED COPIES FROM THE IBT FOR ALL OF OUR MEMBERS, WE WILL NOTIFY THE MEMBERSHIP, WHEN THOSE COPIES ARE DELIEVRED TO THE UNION HALL. 

PLEASE DOWNLOAD THE PDF VERSION AND SHARE IT WITH YOUR UPS TEAMSTER BROTHERS AND SISTERS.

http://www.teamsterslocal100.com/docs/contracts/6161478090_master_final.pdf

http://www.teamsterslocal100.com/docs/contracts/61614_central_region_final.pdf

http://www.teamsterslocal100.com/docs/contracts/2013_2018_ups_ohiorider.pdf

UPS TEAMSTERS VOLUNTEER
TO CLEAN-UP BOTANICAL GARDEN
AT CINCINNATI ZOO
Greg Schneider reported on the good work being done by a handful of UPS Teamsters at the Cincinnati Zoo.  Pictured are Greg along with Jeff Normand and Kathleen Pepmeyer in the  Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden.

Thank you to volunteer teams from UPS, Children's Hospital, Cincinnati Zoo and Avondale Community Council for giving back and making a difference in the neighborhoods around the Zoo. Special thanks to the Cincinnati ToolBank for supplying the tools.

 

 

WEINGARTEN

 The term "Weingarten Rights" refers to a U.S. Supreme Court decision (420 US 251, 1974) which ruled that an employee has the right to a union representative in any interview the employer might hold that is intended to investigate a possible discipline charge against the employee. Often compared to the Miranda rights of criminal suspects charged by the police, there is a crucial difference: unless the union contract requires it, the employer does not have to tell the suspected employee that he or she has this right to union representation. The employee must ask for the representation!

The Weingarten Rights simply put are:

  1. The right to be informed, in advance, of the subject matter of disciplinary interviews.  

  2. The right to union representation at such an interview.

Still there is the question of what to do when these rights are violated. Normally, the rule is to follow orders and file a grievance, or in this case an unfair labor practice charge, afterward. If you are required to attend such an interview, and your request for union representation is denied, the best advice is to attend the meeting but respond to any and all questions by simply repeating your request for representation.

Remember, if your request for union representation is denied,

  • Don't refuse or walkout.
  • Attend the meeting but repeat your request for union representation.

 The role of the union representative in a Weingarten meeting:

  • Ask for time to talk in private before the meeting;  
  • Take notes & record the names, dates questions;  
  • Secure "due process" and fair treatment;  
  • Be sure that the grievant is not railroaded;  
  • Object to any attempts to anger or frighten the grievant;  
  • Call a timeout to caucus or recess as needed;  
  • Ask for questions to be rephrased or explained as necessary; 
  • Make no permanent or undo-able decisions at that interview; 
  • Right after the interview, call your union staff.

GET A WITHDRAWAL CARD!!

If you leave your job FOR ANY REASON, please contact the Local 100 office at (513) 769-5100 and

speak with Lisa (ext. 325) to get a withdrawal card.  This will stop your union dues obligation while you are not working.

Or, you may fill-out the withdrawal card request below and bring it to the Local 100 office.

The fee to obtain a withdrawal card is $0.50.

WITHDRAWAL CARD REQUEST

NAME __________________________________________________

ADDRESS _______________________________________________

PHONE # _________________    SS# (last 4 digits) _____________

EMPLOYER ______________________________________________

LAST DAY WORKED________________________________________

Did you know that labor unions made the following 36 things possible?

  1. Weekends without work
  2. All breaks at work, including your lunch breaks
  3. Paid vacation
  4. Family & Medical Leave Act (FMLA)
  5. Sick leave
  6. Social Security
  7. Minimum wage
  8. Civil Rights Act/Title VII - prohibits employer discrimination
  9. 8-hour work day
  10. Overtime pay
  11. Child labor laws
  12. Occupational Safety & Health Act (OSHA)
  13. 40-hour work week
  14. Workers' compensation (workers' comp)
  15. Unemployment insurance
  16. Pensions
  17. Workplace safety standards and regulations
  18. Employer health care insurance
  19. Collective bargaining rights for employees
  20. Wrongful termination laws
  21. Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA)
  22. Whistleblower protection laws
  23. Employee Polygraph Protection Act (EPPA) - prohibits employers from using a lie detector test on an employee
  24. Veteran's Employment and Training Services (VETS)
  25. Compensation increases and evaluations (i.e. raises)
  26. Sexual harassment laws
  27. Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA)
  28. Holiday pay
  29. Employer dental, life, and vision insurance
  30. Privacy rights
  31. Pregnancy and parental leave
  32. Military leave
  33. The right to strike
  34. Public education for children
  35. Equal Pay Acts of 1963 & 2011 - requires employers pay men and women equally for the same amount of work
  36. Laws ending sweatshops in the United States

Thank a union member by buying union-made in America products!

 
 
Teamsters Local 100
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