Site Map Icon
RSS Feed icon
 
 
 
Member Login
Username:

Password:


Not registered yet?
Click Here to sign-up

Forgot Your Login?
<< September 2014 >>
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30
Current Campaigns
  • Teamsters are standing together to protect good jobs as Sysco, the country’s largest foodservice provider, attempts to purchase its only national competitor, US Foods. Join our campaign to demand that Sysco and US Foods honor their agreements with 11,500 Teamsters and protect the livelihoods of the men and women who make these companies leaders in the industry. LIKE our Facebook page, here.

  • Taylor Farms workers in Tracy, California are standing up against poverty wages, disrespect and severe violations of their most basic rights. These 900 food processing workers in the Central Valley cut, wash and package salads and other products for the largest supplier of fresh-cut produce in the country. They feed the customers of major grocers, retailers and restaurant chains, including Walmart and McDonald’s.

    With a revenue of $1.8 billion in 2012, Taylor Farms can afford to treat its workers in Tracy with dignity and pay fair wages, just like their Teamster coworkers have at Taylor Farms’ facilities in Salinas, California. But when workers came together to organize with Teamsters Local 601, the company responded mercilessly. It fired, harassed, and punished workers for supporting the union. The company threatened immigrant workers with deportation, hiring an army of union-busters to run a non-stop fear campaign. During an NLRB election for union representation, Taylor Farms deployed a goon squad of supervisors to intimidate workers. The company’s violations were so egregious that the Labor Board impounded ballots while it investigates hundreds of Unfair Labor Practice charges.

    Workers in Tracy, following in the footsteps of labor leader and civil rights icon Cesar Chavez, are taking their fight to the public. The workers’ struggle for a better life for their families is supported by Teamsters in California and nationwide. We are building a movement for respect for the workers who feed America.

    ¡Si Se Puede!

  • The 2014 elections are right around the corner and this is your headquarters for the Teamsters Vote 2014 program. The page provides information on registering to vote, news about the Teamsters Vote 2014 campaign and a legislative scorecard that shows how your Member of Congress and Senators voted on the issues that matter to Teamster members and America’s working families.

  • Taxi drivers in Washington, D.C. are fed up!

    After years of unfair regulations and lack of respect, we are fighting back by forming the Washington, D.C. Taxi Operators Association. Our association will be backed by Teamsters Local 922 and the 1.4 million-member International Brotherhood of Teamsters.

  • The Teamsters have stood in solidarity with worker struggles in other countries since our founding. With economic globalization, our ability to organize increasingly depends on our ability to build alliances with workers on a global scale.
    More than ever, Teamsters are organizing and bargaining with multi-national companies. A key objective of our Global Strategies Campaign is to build strong alliances with unions around the globe who organize and bargain with common employers. Our focus is on workers in the emerging global supply chains – the infrastructure of globalization.
    Globalization creates new opportunities for international worker solidarity. We seek common cause with workers around the world to build social justice for all workers and the communities in which they live.

  • This web page provides information on our fight against fast-track legislation. The measure requires Congress to take only a quick up-or-down vote on secret trade deals like the Trans-Pacific Partnership and does not allow such agreements to be amended. It limits Congress’ constitutionally mandated oversight of such trade deals and lets others decide what’s best for America. The result is fewer good-paying U.S. jobs and unsafe food and products for Americans. Read more to find out why fast track is the wrong track for Teamsters and America.

Teamster News Headlines
http://teamster.org/news/headline-news
UNION STRONG

Visit Unions-America.com!

SHARE YOUR GOOD IDEAS

WE KNOW YOU ARE SMART!

So, you if have a great Idea?

Or a good suggestion.....

Share it with your Union.

513-769-5100

 

A Labor Day Message from

Teamsters General President James P. Hoffa

On the first Monday of every September, our nation honors the contributions and sacrifices of millions of working men and women. Labor Day is about remembering labor’s triumphs and the workers without whom society would not function. But it’s also about solidarity and celebrating our movement—a movement that today is alive and well and still fighting for a strong middle class.

The labor movement, and the Teamsters Union in particular, is alive and well and is still forcing change. Labor is behind the movement to raise the minimum wage and shining a spotlight on income inequality. And the Teamsters Union is still organizing new members. Many workers know that unions are the key to a better life, and Labor Day is a time to remind everyone else about that fact. That’s why the Teamsters Union has organized more than 40,000 school bus workers in the last few years; why nearly 600 paratransit drivers in Chicago and hundreds more parking workers in Boston just joined the Teamsters; why thousands of taxi drivers nationwide are forming associations with the Teamsters.

For far too many people, Labor Day is seen simply as a day of rest. But for a growing set of U.S. workers, there is no break from trying to earn enough to support their families. Despite a dip in unemployment during the past few years, low pay continues to plague many employees while their corporate bosses rake in record profits.

The roots of the American middle class' economic decline are decades in the making. Spurred by a decline in union membership, fewer manufacturing jobs and an increase in the service economy, it has gotten harder and harder for workers to make ends meet. And those changes have been exacerbated by trade deals like NAFTA that have led to more than a million lost jobs.

Improving the outlook for U.S workers isn't about creating millions of minimum-wage jobs. It is about creating sustainable, skilled employment that allows Americans to earn a fair wage with benefits that allows them to pay for housing and food on the table and sustain a middle-class lifestyle.

Corporations are increasingly looking to friendly lawmakers on the Hill who are only too happy to reduce the "burden" on billionaires while rank-and-file workers suffer. Despite being a nation that gave birth to the epic failed energy conglomerate Enron Corp. and mega-banks that drove the U.S. into a recession and threaten to do so again, for too many in Congress, there is no limit to obstacles they will hurdle for their corporate cronies.

Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for the average worker. That's why we have tobacco field workers living in squalor and getting sick and injured while working for the minimum wage in North Carolina. That's why we have fast-food workers who are victimized by successful companies allegedly stealing their wages. And it is why we have thousands of low-wage workers taking to the streets over and over again to say enough.

Hardworking Americans find themselves at a crossroads. With the November elections looming, they need to carefully consider their options to help turn the U.S. economy in a positive direction. It starts with backing candidates who place the people above the powerful.

 

It's Labor Day weekend, an opportunity for workers to relax, reflect and take pride in our accomplishments and the knowledge that we have changed our country for the better.

But it’s also a time for us to pledge our support for our brothers and sisters who are fighting tooth and nail every day just to get by, who are languishing without the good jobs and fair wages they need to support their families. In this country, someone working the minimum wage makes $290 a week. You and I both know that’s not enough to feed a family and keep a home warm in winter, let alone be able to buy your kids back-to-school supplies.

This weekend is Labor Day weekend, but Election Day is coming. We’ve got a big fight on our hands now, a fight that will determine whether workers continue to struggle or whether we can revitalize our communities that have been devastated by big banks and corporate greed.

Will we elect officials who’ll raise wages and create jobs or ones who’ll give more tax breaks to corporations and CEOs and leave workers behind?

We need to raise the standard of living in this country. We need to raise workers’ share of the fruits of our own labor because it’s not right that CEOs are the only ones profiting from our sweat. We need to raise the number of kids who go to college and the number of seniors who retire in security and comfort. We need to raise our voices. We need to roll up our sleeves and fight.

It starts with raising the minimum wage. It ends with an economy that works for everyone, not just corporations and CEOs.

It starts this weekend. It ends on Election Day, with victories for elected officials who will fight for working people every single day they're in office.

Will you join me, brothers and sisters? To fight not just for ourselves, but for all working families—and for the future of the country we love?

It’s going to be a tough fight, but you and I have never shied away from one of those before, not when workers’ lives are on the line. Let’s stand together and win this one in November.

(copied from an AFL-CIO letter sent to union leaders this weekend)



old union hall

The Next

Membership Meetings

will be

September  2, 2014

at 7 PM


 

 

 

REMINDER: IT IS NOT TOO LATE TO REGISTER

FOR THE LOCAL 100 GOLF TOURNAMENT

Teamsters Local 100

GOLF OUTING

September 6, 2014

KENTON COUNTY GOLF COURSE

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL

ROBERT HUFF AT 513-200-6497 or

BRIAN SIZEMORE AT 859-816-5290




TEAMSTERS LOCAL 100

SUPPORTS THE

MEMBERS

OF THE BUTLER COUNTY

CHILDREN'S SERVICES

INDEPENDENT UNION.

Below is a notice sent by email this weekend

from the City of Cincinnati

Human Resources Department:

Just wanted to provide an update on the retro mass pay increase.

As you are aware, AFSCME, CODE, and Teamsters employees

received a 1.5% COLA that was implemented this pay period.

The effective date for CODE was 7/7/2013, for AFSCME it was 8/18/2013,

and for Teamsters it was 10/27/2013.

Retroactive pay was also calculated and paid using those dates.

For the retro pay, employees will see either RET,
which designates pensionable earnings,
or REN is used for non-pensionable earnings.
REN applies to overtime and is also used for any retro paid
to any employee who terminated employment prior to August 3,2014.
Some employees were temporarily promoted during this period and their
retro may not have calculated correctly if they were temporarily promoted to
a non-represented position or if they moved between D0 and D0C. 
HR is currently working to identify those individuals to ensure that the retro
calculated correctly and to correct, as needed.
HR Liaisions were advised last week to notify Lisa Berning of the employee's
name and CHRIS ID number and the Divisions affected.
We will make every effort to correct any identified errors
as quickly as possible.
Lisa Berning is te HR contact for the technical aspect of the pay increase.
Thanks very much.
For Teamster Workers at the GCWW, our next scheduled raise is
October 27, 2014. 
We have 1% raise, which is tied to all other City Bargaining Units. 
We included a "Me Too" clause, where if any other City Employees
receive a larger wage increse (larger than 1%),
we will rexceive that larger wage increase.
This year both the Firefighters Union and the Police Union
are in contract negotiations.
Neither of these groups,
representing more than 1700 City Employees,
have received a raise in about six years.

The New UPS Contract Books are HERE! 

Ask your steward or your business agent

to bring some into your work area.

Cheers to the UPS team for installing this ramp

this week for an elderly client in KY! #UPS

This Week in Labor History
September 01
The Int’l Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers and Helpers is founded at a meeting in Chicago, the product of two separate brotherhoods created over the previous 13 years - 1893

Congress declares Labor Day a national holiday – 1894
(From the Folks Who Brought You The Weekend is a sweeping, highly readable history of U.S. labor that will be welcomed by anyone interested in learning more about the struggle of American working people to better their lives through collective action.)

Some 30,000 women from 26 trades marched in Chicago's Labor Day parade - 1903

Walter Reuther is born. He went on to become a founder of the United Auto Workers and was president of the Congress of Industrial Organizations when it merged with the AFL in 1955 - 1907

A 3-week strike in Woonsocket, R.I., part of a national movement to obtain a minimum wage for textile workers, resulted in the deaths of three workers. Ultimately more than 420,000 workers struck nationally - 1934

In Hawaii, some 26,000 sugar workers represented by the Longshoremen’s union begin what is to become a successful 79-day strike that shuts down 33 of the 34 sugar plantations on the islands. The strike brought an end to Hawaii's paternalistic labor relations and impacted political and social institutions throughout the then-territory - 1946

Int'l Metal Engravers & Marking Device Workers Union changed its name to Int’l Association of Machinists - 1956

Some 20,000 Pennsylvania Railroad shop workers effectively halt operations in 13 states for 12 days. It was the first shutdown in the company's 114-year history - 1960

Boot Shoe Workers' Union merged with Retail Clerks Int’l Union - 1977

The Journeymen Barbers, Hairdressers and Cosmetologists' Int'l Union of America merged with United Food & Commercial Workers - 1980

Glass Bottle Blowers' Association of the United States & Canada merged with Int'l Brotherhood of Pottery & Allied Workers to become Glass, Pottery, Plastics & Allied Workers - 1982

Aluminum, Brick & Clay Workers Int'l Union merged with United Glass & Ceramic Workers of North America to form Int'l Union of Aluminum, Brick & Glass Workers - 1982

Brotherhood of Railway, Airline & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express & Station Employees changed name to Transportation-Communications Union - 1987

Coopers Int’l Union of North America merged with Glass, Molders, Pottery, Plastics & Allied Workers Int'l Union - 1992

The federal minimum wage is increased to $5.15 per hour - 1997

The AFL-CIO creates Working America, a nonpartisan, non-profit organization designed to build alliances among non-union working people - 2003

September 02
White and Chinese immigrants battle in Rock Springs, Wyo., fueled by racial tensions and the practice of Union Pacific Railroad of hiring lower-paid Chinese over whites. At least 25 Chinese died and 15 more were injured. Rioters burned 75 Chinese homes – 1885
(Chicken Feathers and Garlic Skin: Diary of a Chinese Garment Factory Girl on Saipan: We’ve all read newspaper and magazine reports about how miserable life is for garment workers in Third World sweatshops. But we’ve read very little in the workers’ own words, and that’s what this fascinating book offers. In Chicken Feathers and Garlic Skin, 25-year-old Chun Yu Wang tells of her life as a Chinese emigrant to Saipan, searching for a better life 2,000 miles from her home.)

Operating railway employees win 8-hour day - 1916

Mineowners bomb West Virginia strikers by plane, using homemade bombs filled with nails and metal fragments. The bombs missed their targets or failed to explode - 1921

President Eisenhower signs legislation expanding Social Security by providing much wider coverage and including 10 million additional Americans, most of them self-employed farmers, with additional benefits - 1954

The Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) was signed by President Ford, regulating and insuring pensions and other benefits, and increasing protections for workers – 1974
(Retire Happy: What To Do NOW to Guarantee A Great Retirement: Everyone who works for a living thinks at some point about retirement, but few actually consider what that really means, other than escaping the daily grind. For sure, most of us worry about having enough money, and this highly readable book provides a lot of information and advice on the subject: how much we’ll need, how to make the most of what we’ve accumulated, how to accumulate more (even as we get close to retirement) and how to make it last. For that advice alone, Retire Happy is worth the price.)

September 03
African-American cotton pickers organize and strike in Lee County, Texas, against miserably low wages and other injustices, including a growers’ arrangement with local law enforcement to round up blacks on vagrancy charges, then force them to work off their fines on select plantations.  Over the course of September a white mob put down the strike, killing 15 strikers in the process - 1891

Some 300 musicians working in Chicago movie houses strike to protest their impending replacement by talking movies - 1928

Twenty-five workers die, unable to escape a fire at the Imperial Poultry processing plant in Hamlet, N.C. Managers had locked fire doors to prevent the theft of chicken nuggets. The plant had operated for 11 years without a single safety inspection - 1991

September 04
Twelve thousand New York tailors strike over sweatshop conditions - 1894

More than 140 attendees at a benefit for a civil rights group are injured in the “Peekskill Riots” in Peekskill, N.Y.  The victims were among the 20,000 people leaving a concert featuring African-American Paul Robeson, well-known for his strong pro-unionism, civil rights activism and left-wing affiliations.  The departing concert-goers had to drive through a miles-long gauntlet of rock-throwing racists and others chanting "go on back to Russia, you niggers" and "white niggers" - 1949

Int’l Brotherhood of Bookbinders merged with Graphic Arts Int’l Union - 1972

In what many believe was to become the longest strike in U.S. history, 600 Teamster-represented workers walk out at the Diamond Walnut processing plant in Stockton, Calif., after the company refused to restore a 30-percent pay cut they had earlier taken to help out the company.  The two sides ultimately agreed to a new contract after 14 years - 1991

September 05
Between 20,000 and 30,000 marchers participate in New York's first Labor Day parade, demanding the 8-hour day - 1882

"Palmer raids" on all Wobbly halls and offices in 48 cities in U.S.  Alexander Palmer, U.S. Attorney General, was rounding up radicals and leftists - 1917

Ten thousand angry textile strikers, fighting for better wages and working conditions, besiege a factory in Fall River, Mass., where 300 strikebreakers are working. The scabs are rescued by police using tear gas and pistols on the strikers - 1934

General strike begins across U.S. maritime industry, stopping all shipping. The strikers were objecting to the government's post-war National Wage Stabilization Board order that reduced pay increases negotiated by maritime unions - 1946

September 06
One of the worst disasters in the history of U.S. anthracite mining occurred at the Avondale Mine, near Scranton, Pa., when a fire originating from a furnace at the bottom of a 237-foot shaft roared up the shaft, killing 110 miners - 1869

Tony Boyle, former president of the United Mine Workers, is charged with murder in the 1969 deaths of former UMW rival Joseph A. Yablonski and his wife and daughter - 1973

September 07
Federal employees win the right to receive Workers' Compensation insurance coverage - 1916

—Compiled and edited by David Prosten

Copyright © 2014 Union Communication Services—Worker Institute at Cornell ILR, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you opted-in, or are a current customer.

Our mailing address is:
Union Communication Services—Worker Institute at Cornell ILR
249 Highland Ave.
Rochester, NY 14620

THE NEW UPS CONTRACT

HAS BEEN RELEASED IN PDF VERSION.  

LOCAL 100 HAS ORDERED PRINTED COPIES FROM THE IBT FOR ALL OF OUR MEMBERS, WE WILL NOTIFY THE MEMBERSHIP, WHEN THOSE COPIES ARE DELIEVRED TO THE UNION HALL. 

PLEASE DOWNLOAD THE PDF VERSION AND SHARE IT WITH YOUR UPS TEAMSTER BROTHERS AND SISTERS.

http://www.teamsterslocal100.com/docs/contracts/6161478090_master_final.pdf

http://www.teamsterslocal100.com/docs/contracts/61614_central_region_final.pdf

http://www.teamsterslocal100.com/docs/contracts/2013_2018_ups_ohiorider.pdf

UPS TEAMSTERS VOLUNTEER
TO CLEAN-UP BOTANICAL GARDEN
AT CINCINNATI ZOO
Greg Schneider reported on the good work being done by a handful of UPS Teamsters at the Cincinnati Zoo.  Pictured are Greg along with Jeff Normand and Kathleen Pepmeyer in the  Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden.

Thank you to volunteer teams from UPS, Children's Hospital, Cincinnati Zoo and Avondale Community Council for giving back and making a difference in the neighborhoods around the Zoo. Special thanks to the Cincinnati ToolBank for supplying the tools.

 

 

WEINGARTEN

 The term "Weingarten Rights" refers to a U.S. Supreme Court decision (420 US 251, 1974) which ruled that an employee has the right to a union representative in any interview the employer might hold that is intended to investigate a possible discipline charge against the employee. Often compared to the Miranda rights of criminal suspects charged by the police, there is a crucial difference: unless the union contract requires it, the employer does not have to tell the suspected employee that he or she has this right to union representation. The employee must ask for the representation!

The Weingarten Rights simply put are:

  1. The right to be informed, in advance, of the subject matter of disciplinary interviews.  

  2. The right to union representation at such an interview.

Still there is the question of what to do when these rights are violated. Normally, the rule is to follow orders and file a grievance, or in this case an unfair labor practice charge, afterward. If you are required to attend such an interview, and your request for union representation is denied, the best advice is to attend the meeting but respond to any and all questions by simply repeating your request for representation.

Remember, if your request for union representation is denied,

  • Don't refuse or walkout.
  • Attend the meeting but repeat your request for union representation.

 The role of the union representative in a Weingarten meeting:

  • Ask for time to talk in private before the meeting;  
  • Take notes & record the names, dates questions;  
  • Secure "due process" and fair treatment;  
  • Be sure that the grievant is not railroaded;  
  • Object to any attempts to anger or frighten the grievant;  
  • Call a timeout to caucus or recess as needed;  
  • Ask for questions to be rephrased or explained as necessary; 
  • Make no permanent or undo-able decisions at that interview; 
  • Right after the interview, call your union staff.

AS WE GEAR UP FOR THE 2014 MID TERM ELECTIONS AND THE OHIO GOVERNOR ELECTION. 

TEAMSTERS AND ALL UNION MEMBERS NEED TO KNOW THAT THOSE THAT WOULD BUST OUR UNIONS WILL OUT SPEND US AND TRY TO BUY THESE ELECTIONS.   WE NEED TO BE OUT-SPOKEN WITH OUR NEIGHBORS AND FAMILY MEMBERS AND GET THE VOTE OUT.

Former Secretary of Labor, Robert Reich debated a Koch-apologist yesterday who claimed America's unions funneled more into politics than the Koch brothers. Baloney. Union money at least comes from large numbers of workers seeking higher pay and better working conditions; Koch m...oney comes from two brothers seeking to entrench their power and privilege. And it's clear the Koch brothers are spending way more. In 2012, union spending (PAC, individual, outside) totaled less than $153.5 million, while Koch spending totaled $412.6 million.

Tell Congress: Stop Citizens United!

Citizens United is destroying our democracy. Since the decision, right-wing groups have spent nearly $1 billion trying to buy elections in America.

City councils all across Ohio, including Athens, Oberlin, Akron, and Cleveland Heights, have passed resolutions urging Congress to take action. They want the decision — which unleashed hundreds of millions of dollars in special interest spending in elections — reversed.

Today, you can speak out with them. Join Ed FitzGerald, sign up below to urge Congress to turn back the disastrous effects of Citizens United.

Sign this petition

GET A WITHDRAWAL CARD!!

If you leave your job FOR ANY REASON, please contact the Local 100 office at (513) 769-5100 and

speak with Lisa (ext. 325) to get a withdrawal card.  This will stop your union dues obligation while you are not working.

Or, you may fill-out the withdrawal card request below and bring it to the Local 100 office.

The fee to obtain a withdrawal card is $0.50.

WITHDRAWAL CARD REQUEST

NAME __________________________________________________

ADDRESS _______________________________________________

PHONE # _________________    SS# (last 4 digits) _____________

EMPLOYER ______________________________________________

LAST DAY WORKED________________________________________

Did you know that labor unions made the following 36 things possible?

  1. Weekends without work
  2. All breaks at work, including your lunch breaks
  3. Paid vacation
  4. Family & Medical Leave Act (FMLA)
  5. Sick leave
  6. Social Security
  7. Minimum wage
  8. Civil Rights Act/Title VII - prohibits employer discrimination
  9. 8-hour work day
  10. Overtime pay
  11. Child labor laws
  12. Occupational Safety & Health Act (OSHA)
  13. 40-hour work week
  14. Workers' compensation (workers' comp)
  15. Unemployment insurance
  16. Pensions
  17. Workplace safety standards and regulations
  18. Employer health care insurance
  19. Collective bargaining rights for employees
  20. Wrongful termination laws
  21. Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA)
  22. Whistleblower protection laws
  23. Employee Polygraph Protection Act (EPPA) - prohibits employers from using a lie detector test on an employee
  24. Veteran's Employment and Training Services (VETS)
  25. Compensation increases and evaluations (i.e. raises)
  26. Sexual harassment laws
  27. Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA)
  28. Holiday pay
  29. Employer dental, life, and vision insurance
  30. Privacy rights
  31. Pregnancy and parental leave
  32. Military leave
  33. The right to strike
  34. Public education for children
  35. Equal Pay Acts of 1963 & 2011 - requires employers pay men and women equally for the same amount of work
  36. Laws ending sweatshops in the United States

Thank a union member by buying union-made in America products!

 
 
Teamsters Local 100
Copyright © 2014, All Rights Reserved.
Powered By UnionActive™

64096 hits since Feb 14, 2012
Visit Unions-America.com!

Top of Page image