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<< December 2014 >>
S M T W T F S
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Current Campaigns
  • This web page provides information on our fight against fast-track legislation. The measure requires Congress to take only a quick up-or-down vote on secret trade deals like the Trans-Pacific Partnership and does not allow such agreements to be amended. It limits Congress’ constitutionally mandated oversight of such trade deals and lets others decide what’s best for America. The result is fewer good-paying U.S. jobs and unsafe food and products for Americans. Read more to find out why fast track is the wrong track for Teamsters and America.

  • Teamsters are standing together to protect good jobs as Sysco, the country’s largest foodservice provider, attempts to purchase its only national competitor, US Foods. Join our campaign to demand that Sysco and US Foods honor their agreements with 11,500 Teamsters and protect the livelihoods of the men and women who make these companies leaders in the industry. LIKE our Facebook page, here.

  • Taylor Farms workers in Tracy, California are standing up against poverty wages, disrespect and severe violations of their most basic rights. These 900 food processing workers in the Central Valley cut, wash and package salads and other products for the largest supplier of fresh-cut produce in the country. They feed the customers of major grocers, retailers and restaurant chains, including Walmart and McDonald’s.

    With a revenue of $1.8 billion in 2012, Taylor Farms can afford to treat its workers in Tracy with dignity and pay fair wages, just like their Teamster coworkers have at Taylor Farms’ facilities in Salinas, California. But when workers came together to organize with Teamsters Local 601, the company responded mercilessly. It fired, harassed, and punished workers for supporting the union. The company threatened immigrant workers with deportation, hiring an army of union-busters to run a non-stop fear campaign. During an NLRB election for union representation, Taylor Farms deployed a goon squad of supervisors to intimidate workers. The company’s violations were so egregious that the Labor Board impounded ballots while it investigates hundreds of Unfair Labor Practice charges.

    Workers in Tracy, following in the footsteps of labor leader and civil rights icon Cesar Chavez, are taking their fight to the public. The workers’ struggle for a better life for their families is supported by Teamsters in California and nationwide. We are building a movement for respect for the workers who feed America.

    ¡Si Se Puede!

  • Taxi drivers in Washington, D.C. are fed up!

    After years of unfair regulations and lack of respect, we are fighting back by forming the Washington, D.C. Taxi Operators Association. Our association will be backed by Teamsters Local 922 and the 1.4 million-member International Brotherhood of Teamsters.

  • The Teamsters have stood in solidarity with worker struggles in other countries since our founding. With economic globalization, our ability to organize increasingly depends on our ability to build alliances with workers on a global scale.
    More than ever, Teamsters are organizing and bargaining with multi-national companies. A key objective of our Global Strategies Campaign is to build strong alliances with unions around the globe who organize and bargain with common employers. Our focus is on workers in the emerging global supply chains – the infrastructure of globalization.
    Globalization creates new opportunities for international worker solidarity. We seek common cause with workers around the world to build social justice for all workers and the communities in which they live.

  • Teamsters at Republic Services/Allied Waste have stood together in recent years to fight for strong contracts, including going on strike and supporting their fellow striking workers. Workers continue to fight for strong contracts that include retirement security at the second largest solid waste company. This campaign page is dedicated to those ongoing efforts.

  • Welcome to Teamster Organizing!

    You've heard it said that the best defense is a good offense. In the war on workers, Teamster Organizing is on the offensive! We're winning power for workers across industries and across North America. Join us!

  • Join the movement to stop the war on workers. Corporate CEOs and billionaires are attacking you, your family and your job. The battlefield is in statehouses throughout the country.  Our jobs, our health, our kids, our retirement and our standard of living are all at risk. Check this page frequently for updates. 

  • This webpage provides updates to AWI/White Rose Teamsters about the company’s filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy on September 9, 2014. The Warehouse Division of the Teamsters Union has been appointed to the Unsecured Creditors’ Committee in the bankruptcy filing and the union has assembled a team to monitor the bankruptcy. The Teamsters will play an active role in the bankruptcy process in an effort to best protect the jobs, wages and benefits of our members.

Teamster News Headlines
http://teamster.org/news/headline-news
UNION STRONG

Visit Unions-America.com!

SHARE YOUR GOOD IDEAS

WE KNOW YOU ARE SMART!

So, you if have a great Idea?

Or a good suggestion.....

Share it with your Union.

513-769-5100

 

TEAMSTERS, YOU AND EVERY

WORKING MAN AND WOMAN NEED

TO COME FORWARD TODAY. WE NEED

YOU TO CALL YOUR REPRESETATIVES

IN CONGRESS AND YOUR SENATORS.

IF THEY ARE PERMITTED TO PASS

THESE SECRET NEW PENSION RULES,

PENSIONS FOR BOTH THOSE

WORKING TODAY AND THOSE

ALREADY RETIRED WILL BE

TARGETED AND CUT.

YOUR FUTURE DEPENDS ON YOUR

ACTION TODAY!

Last night, the House released the text of the omnibus spending bill for fiscal year 2015, and the Teamsters Union was very disappointed to see that it will keep the government open on the backs of hardworking Americans and retirees. We are specifically opposed to the last-minute addition of a pension amendment and the inclusion of a proposal to increase the number of hours that truck drivers are on the road each week.

We urge you to please call your elected officials in the House and Senate and ask that they vote NO on the rule and NO on the omnibus spending bill.

· The Teamsters Union is opposed to the Omnibus Spending Bill. It keeps the government open on the back of hardworking Americans and retirees.

· This bill is the ugly side of political backroom dealings and should be voted down so that these issues can be fully debated in the light of day.

· Specifically, we are opposed to the last-minute addition of a pension amendment that threatens the retirement security of thousands of retirees -- an amendment that through procedural manipulation will not even receive a separate vote.

· We have always opposed pension cuts and are disappointed that the House and Senate have taken this action.

· This legislation represents substantial changes to policies that have protected the pensions of workers for decades. It should not be changed through procedural manipulation.

· We are also opposed to the inclusion of a proposal that would increase the number of hours that truck drivers can spend on the road every week -- an increase to more than 80 hours per week. That is too much time to spend behind the wheel, and we oppose this increase.

· And while the legislation threatens pensions and increases the hours Teamsters have to work, it lets every wealthy person contribute over a million and half more dollars into politics, so we will continue to see legislation that benefits the wealthy and not hardworking Americans.

· For all these reasons, the Teamsters Union urges you to vote NO on the rule and NO on the Omnibus bill.

Indiana House of Representatives

District

Name

Party

Room

Phone

1

Visclosky, Peter

D

2256 RHOB

202-225-2461

2

Walorski, Jackie

R

419 CHOB

202-225-3915

3

Stutzman, Marlin

R

1728 LHOB

202-225-4436

4

Rokita, Todd

R

236 CHOB

202-225-5037

5

Brooks, Susan W.

R

1505 LHOB

202-225-2276

6

Messer, Luke

R

508 CHOB

202-225-3021

7

Carson, André

D

2453 RHOB

202-225-4011

8

Bucshon, Larry

R

1005 LHOB

202-225-4636

9

Young, Todd

R

1007 LHOB

202-225-5315

Indiana Senators

Coats, Daniel - (R - IN) Class III 493 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510 (202) 224-5623 Contact: www.coats.senate.gov/contact/

Donnelly, Joe - (D - IN) Class I 720 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510 (202) 224-4814

Contact: www.donnelly.senate.gov/contact/email-joe

Kentucky House of Representatives

District

Name

Party

Room

Phone

1

Whitfield, Ed

R

2184 RHOB

202-225-3115

2

Guthrie, S. Brett

R

308 CHOB

202-225-3501

3

Yarmuth, John A.

D

403 CHOB

202-225-5401

4

Massie, Thomas

R

314 CHOB

202-225-3465

5

Rogers, Harold

R

2406 RHOB

202-225-4601

6

Barr, Andy

R

1432 LHOB

202-225-4706

Kentucky Senators

McConnell, Mitch - (R - KY) Class II 317 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510 (202) 224-2541 Contact: www.mcconnell.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?p=contact

Paul, Rand - (R - KY) Class III 124 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510 (202) 224-4343 Contact: www.paul.senate.gov/?p=contact

Ohio House of Representatives

District

Name

Party

Room

Phone

1

Chabot, Steve

R

2371 RHOB

202-225-2216

2

Wenstrup, Brad

R

1223 LHOB

202-225-3164

3

Beatty, Joyce

D

417 CHOB

202-225-4324

4

Jordan, Jim

R

1524 LHOB

202-225-2676

5

Latta, Robert E.

R

2448 RHOB

202-225-6405

6

Johnson, Bill

R

1710 LHOB

202-225-5705

7

Gibbs, Bob

R

329 CHOB

202-225-6265

8

Boehner, John A.

R

1011 LHOB

202-225-6205

9

Kaptur, Marcy

D

2186 RHOB

202-225-4146

10

Turner, Michael

R

2239 RHOB

202-225-6465

11

Fudge, Marcia L.

D

2344 RHOB

202-225-7032

12

Tiberi, Pat

R

106 CHOB

202-225-5355

13

Ryan, Tim

D

1421 LHOB

202-225-5261

14

Joyce, David

R

1535 LHOB

202-225-5731

15

Stivers, Steve

R

1022 LHOB

202-225-2015

16

Renacci, Jim

R

130 CHOB

202-225-3876

Ohio Senators

Brown, Sherrod - (D - OH) Class I 713 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510 (202) 224-2315 Contact: www.brown.senate.gov/contact/

Portman, Rob - (R - OH) Class III 448 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510 (202) 224-3353 Contact: www.portman.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact?p=contact...

There's still time to fight Congress's last-minute pension cut deal by calling Reps on the Rules Committee. But we have to act now. Here's who to call and what to say.

The proposed pension cuts amendment has now moved on to the House Rules Committee. They need to sign off on it to send it to the full House to vote on the omnibus funding bill. We still have a chance to get the Rules Committee to shoot down the earmark.

Our allies in Washington encourage the following:

Contact the representatives listed below on the House Rules Committee.

We need them to say NO to the earmark on pensions. The legislation was developed behind closed doors. The 163 pages have barely been seen and have not been debated. There has been no discussion of the earmarked legislation. This is not a consensus proposal and is opposed by AARP, the Pension Rights Center, The International Association of Machinists, The Teamsters, The Steelworkers, and other organizations.

Adding this earmark to the Funding Bill is a last minute maneuver to allow pension cuts that have been protected by ERISA for forty years. There is no reason to rush this through in this manner.

Ask them to remove the earmark from the omnibus bill.

House Rules Committee
Pete Sessions (R) TX - Chair
202-225-2231

Virginia Foxx (R) NC - Vice Chair
202-225-2071

Louise Slaughter (D) NY - Ranking Democrat
202-225-3615

Rob Woodall (R) GA
202-225-4272

Tom Cole (R) OK
202-225-6165
Issues:
Pension and Benefits   


 

MERRY

CHRISTMAS 

AND

HAPPY

NEW YEAR

 

This Week in Labor History

December 08
Twenty-five unions found the American Federation of Labor (AFL) in Columbus, Ohio; Cigarmaker’s union leader Samuel Gompers is elected president. The AFL’s founding document’s preamble reads: “A struggle is going on in all of the civilized world between oppressors and oppressed of all countries, between capitalist and laborer...” – 1886
(There is Power in a Union: The Epic Story of Labor in America: This thoughtful and highly readable history of the American labor movement traces unionism from the textile mills of Lowell, Massachusetts in the 1820s to organized labor’s decline in the 1980s and struggle for survival and growth today. Illustrated with dozens of photos, posters and more.)

114-day newspaper strike begins, New York City - 1962

President Bill Clinton signs The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) - 1993

Nearly 230 jailed teachers—about one-fourth of the 1,000-member Middletown Township, N.J., staff—are ordered freed after they and their colleagues agree to end a 9-day strike and go into mediation with the local school board - 2001

Faced with a national unemployment rate of 10 percent, President Barack Obama outlines new multibillion-dollar stimulus and jobs proposals, saying the country must continue to "spend our way out of this recession" until more Americans are back at work. Joblessness had soared 6 percent in the final two years of George W. Bush’s presidency - 2009

December 09
Ratification of a new labor agreement at Titan Tire of Natchez, Miss., ends the longest strike in the history of the U.S. tire industry, which began May 1, 1998, at the company's Des Moines, Iowa, plant - 2001

December 10 
First sit-down strike in U.S. called by IWW at General Electric in Schenectady, N.Y. - 1906 
(No Contract, No Peace: A Legal Guide to Contract Campaigns, Strikes, and Lockouts is a must-have for any union or activist considering aggressive action to combat management’s growing economic war against workers. No Contract, No Peace! updates information contained in the first edition, entitled Strikes, Picketing and Inside Campaigns, to include reference to recent union activities and NLRB decisions that have affected the labor relations environment. Schwartz’s familiarity with labor and employment law combines with his activist spirit to provide innovative yet practical tips for mounting and maintaining meaningful campaigns designed to build union and workers’ power.)

Int’l Human Rights Day, commemorating the signing at the United Nations of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states, in part: “Everyone has the right to form and join trade unions for the protection of his interests.” - 1948

American Federation of Teachers Local 89 in Atlanta, Georgia, disaffiliates from the national union because of an AFT directive that all its locals integrate. A year later, the AFT expelled all locals that refused to do so - 1956 

December 11 
A small group of black farmers organize the Colored Farmers’ National Alliance and Cooperative Union in Houston County, Texas. They had been barred from membership in the all-white Southern Farmers’ Alliance. Through intensive organizing, along with merging with another black farmers group, the renamed Colored Alliance by 1891 claimed a membership of 1.2 million - 1886
(On the Global Waterfront: The Fight to Free the Charleston 5: Read this story about “the movers and shakers versus the moved and shaken”—longshoremen in South Carolina who confronted attempts to wipe out their union, the state’s most powerful black organization, and rallied the nation and labor around the world in their successful fight.)

Ten days after an Illinois State mine inspector approved coal dust removal techniques at New Orient mine in West Frankfort, the mine exploded, largely because of coal dust accumulations, killing 119 workers - 1951

The U.S. Department of Labor announces that the nation's unemployment rate had dropped to 3.3 percent, the lowest mark in 15 years - 1968 

Forty thousand workers go on general strike in London, Ontario—a city with a population of 300,000—protesting cuts in social services - 1995 

Michigan becomes the 24th state to Adopt right-to-work legislation. The Republican-dominated state Senate introduced two measures—one covering private workers, the other covering public workers—by surprise five days earlier and immediately voted their passage; the Republican House approved them five days later (the fastest it legally could) and the Republican governor immediately signed both bills - 2012

December 12 
A U.S. immigration sweep of six Swift meat plants results in arrests of nearly 1,300 undocumented workers - 2006

December 13 
Death in San Antonio, Texas, of Samuel Gompers, president and founder of the American Federation of Labor - 1924  

December 14 
Some 33,000 striking members of the Machinists end a 69-day walkout at Boeing after winning pay and benefit increases and protections against subcontracting some of their work overseas - 1995

—Compiled and edited by David Prosten
Copyright © 2014 Union Communication Services—Worker Institute at Cornell ILR, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you opted-in, or are a current customer.

Our mailing address is:
Union Communication Services—Worker Institute at Cornell ILR
36 W. Main St., Suite 440
Rochester, NY 14614

The Next

Membership Meetings

will be

January 6th, 2015

at 7 PM


 

 

 

There have been some problems with Teamsters

losing health benefits and prescription benefits

while filing for disability and /or workers compensation.   

There is no worse time to lose you health benefits

and prescription benefits than while a member is injured or ill. 

We have been working to resolve this problem.

Welcome UPS

We have been in contact with the Teamcare people

to correct this problem.    

The attached link is a pdf version of the instructions:

http://www.teamsterslocal100.com/docs/contracts/STD_Procedures_and_Claim_Form_Combined___FINAL.pdf

These instructions outline the new procedures

to maintain benefits while filing for disability

or filing for workers compensation.   

(When filing for Workers Compensation,

you will also need to file a subrugation agreement,

agreeing to re-pay Teamcare if and when your worker's

compensation claim is approved.)

Since changing from UPS sponsored disability benefits to

Teamcare disability benefits, the procedures have changed. 

With the changes some of our brothers and sisters

have been denied disability benefits

and have been denied health benefits

and prescription benefits. 

Hopefully with these new procedures,

we have addressed these problems.

If you have any questions or issues with obtaining benefits,

please call Dave Webster, 513-769-5100 ext 319

or Sam Bucalo, 513-769-5100 ext 317

http://www.teamsterslocal100.com/docs/contracts/STD_Procedures_and_Claim_Form_Combined___FINAL.pdf

A Labor Day Message from

Teamsters General President James P. Hoffa

On the first Monday of every September, our nation honors the contributions and sacrifices of millions of working men and women. Labor Day is about remembering labor’s triumphs and the workers without whom society would not function. But it’s also about solidarity and celebrating our movement—a movement that today is alive and well and still fighting for a strong middle class.

The labor movement, and the Teamsters Union in particular, is alive and well and is still forcing change. Labor is behind the movement to raise the minimum wage and shining a spotlight on income inequality. And the Teamsters Union is still organizing new members. Many workers know that unions are the key to a better life, and Labor Day is a time to remind everyone else about that fact. That’s why the Teamsters Union has organized more than 40,000 school bus workers in the last few years; why nearly 600 paratransit drivers in Chicago and hundreds more parking workers in Boston just joined the Teamsters; why thousands of taxi drivers nationwide are forming associations with the Teamsters.

For far too many people, Labor Day is seen simply as a day of rest. But for a growing set of U.S. workers, there is no break from trying to earn enough to support their families. Despite a dip in unemployment during the past few years, low pay continues to plague many employees while their corporate bosses rake in record profits.

The roots of the American middle class' economic decline are decades in the making. Spurred by a decline in union membership, fewer manufacturing jobs and an increase in the service economy, it has gotten harder and harder for workers to make ends meet. And those changes have been exacerbated by trade deals like NAFTA that have led to more than a million lost jobs.

Improving the outlook for U.S workers isn't about creating millions of minimum-wage jobs. It is about creating sustainable, skilled employment that allows Americans to earn a fair wage with benefits that allows them to pay for housing and food on the table and sustain a middle-class lifestyle.

Corporations are increasingly looking to friendly lawmakers on the Hill who are only too happy to reduce the "burden" on billionaires while rank-and-file workers suffer. Despite being a nation that gave birth to the epic failed energy conglomerate Enron Corp. and mega-banks that drove the U.S. into a recession and threaten to do so again, for too many in Congress, there is no limit to obstacles they will hurdle for their corporate cronies.

Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for the average worker. That's why we have tobacco field workers living in squalor and getting sick and injured while working for the minimum wage in North Carolina. That's why we have fast-food workers who are victimized by successful companies allegedly stealing their wages. And it is why we have thousands of low-wage workers taking to the streets over and over again to say enough.

Hardworking Americans find themselves at a crossroads. With the November elections looming, they need to carefully consider their options to help turn the U.S. economy in a positive direction. It starts with backing candidates who place the people above the powerful.

 

It's Labor Day weekend, an opportunity for workers to relax, reflect and take pride in our accomplishments and the knowledge that we have changed our country for the better.

But it’s also a time for us to pledge our support for our brothers and sisters who are fighting tooth and nail every day just to get by, who are languishing without the good jobs and fair wages they need to support their families. In this country, someone working the minimum wage makes $290 a week. You and I both know that’s not enough to feed a family and keep a home warm in winter, let alone be able to buy your kids back-to-school supplies.

This weekend is Labor Day weekend, but Election Day is coming. We’ve got a big fight on our hands now, a fight that will determine whether workers continue to struggle or whether we can revitalize our communities that have been devastated by big banks and corporate greed.

Will we elect officials who’ll raise wages and create jobs or ones who’ll give more tax breaks to corporations and CEOs and leave workers behind?

We need to raise the standard of living in this country. We need to raise workers’ share of the fruits of our own labor because it’s not right that CEOs are the only ones profiting from our sweat. We need to raise the number of kids who go to college and the number of seniors who retire in security and comfort. We need to raise our voices. We need to roll up our sleeves and fight.

It starts with raising the minimum wage. It ends with an economy that works for everyone, not just corporations and CEOs.

It starts this weekend. It ends on Election Day, with victories for elected officials who will fight for working people every single day they're in office.

Will you join me, brothers and sisters? To fight not just for ourselves, but for all working families—and for the future of the country we love?

It’s going to be a tough fight, but you and I have never shied away from one of those before, not when workers’ lives are on the line. Let’s stand together and win this one in November.

(copied from an AFL-CIO letter sent to union leaders this weekend)



old union hall

TEAMSTERS LOCAL 100

SUPPORTS THE

MEMBERS

OF THE BUTLER COUNTY

CHILDREN'S SERVICES

INDEPENDENT UNION.

Below is a notice sent by email this weekend

from the City of Cincinnati

Human Resources Department:

Just wanted to provide an update on the retro mass pay increase.

As you are aware, AFSCME, CODE, and Teamsters employees

received a 1.5% COLA that was implemented this pay period.

The effective date for CODE was 7/7/2013, for AFSCME it was 8/18/2013,

and for Teamsters it was 10/27/2013.

Retroactive pay was also calculated and paid using those dates.

For the retro pay, employees will see either RET,
which designates pensionable earnings,
or REN is used for non-pensionable earnings.
REN applies to overtime and is also used for any retro paid
to any employee who terminated employment prior to August 3,2014.
Some employees were temporarily promoted during this period and their
retro may not have calculated correctly if they were temporarily promoted to
a non-represented position or if they moved between D0 and D0C. 
HR is currently working to identify those individuals to ensure that the retro
calculated correctly and to correct, as needed.
HR Liaisions were advised last week to notify Lisa Berning of the employee's
name and CHRIS ID number and the Divisions affected.
We will make every effort to correct any identified errors
as quickly as possible.
Lisa Berning is te HR contact for the technical aspect of the pay increase.
Thanks very much.
For Teamster Workers at the GCWW, our next scheduled raise is
October 27, 2014. 
We have 1% raise, which is tied to all other City Bargaining Units. 
We included a "Me Too" clause, where if any other City Employees
receive a larger wage increse (larger than 1%),
we will rexceive that larger wage increase.
This year both the Firefighters Union and the Police Union
are in contract negotiations.
Neither of these groups,
representing more than 1700 City Employees,
have received a raise in about six years.

The New UPS Contract Books are HERE! 

Ask your steward or your business agent

to bring some into your work area.

Cheers to the UPS team for installing this ramp

this week for an elderly client in KY! #UPS

THE NEW UPS CONTRACT

HAS BEEN RELEASED IN PDF VERSION.  

LOCAL 100 HAS ORDERED PRINTED COPIES FROM THE IBT FOR ALL OF OUR MEMBERS, WE WILL NOTIFY THE MEMBERSHIP, WHEN THOSE COPIES ARE DELIEVRED TO THE UNION HALL. 

PLEASE DOWNLOAD THE PDF VERSION AND SHARE IT WITH YOUR UPS TEAMSTER BROTHERS AND SISTERS.

http://www.teamsterslocal100.com/docs/contracts/6161478090_master_final.pdf

http://www.teamsterslocal100.com/docs/contracts/61614_central_region_final.pdf

http://www.teamsterslocal100.com/docs/contracts/2013_2018_ups_ohiorider.pdf

UPS TEAMSTERS VOLUNTEER
TO CLEAN-UP BOTANICAL GARDEN
AT CINCINNATI ZOO
Greg Schneider reported on the good work being done by a handful of UPS Teamsters at the Cincinnati Zoo.  Pictured are Greg along with Jeff Normand and Kathleen Pepmeyer in the  Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden.

Thank you to volunteer teams from UPS, Children's Hospital, Cincinnati Zoo and Avondale Community Council for giving back and making a difference in the neighborhoods around the Zoo. Special thanks to the Cincinnati ToolBank for supplying the tools.

 

 

WEINGARTEN

 The term "Weingarten Rights" refers to a U.S. Supreme Court decision (420 US 251, 1974) which ruled that an employee has the right to a union representative in any interview the employer might hold that is intended to investigate a possible discipline charge against the employee. Often compared to the Miranda rights of criminal suspects charged by the police, there is a crucial difference: unless the union contract requires it, the employer does not have to tell the suspected employee that he or she has this right to union representation. The employee must ask for the representation!

The Weingarten Rights simply put are:

  1. The right to be informed, in advance, of the subject matter of disciplinary interviews.  

  2. The right to union representation at such an interview.

Still there is the question of what to do when these rights are violated. Normally, the rule is to follow orders and file a grievance, or in this case an unfair labor practice charge, afterward. If you are required to attend such an interview, and your request for union representation is denied, the best advice is to attend the meeting but respond to any and all questions by simply repeating your request for representation.

Remember, if your request for union representation is denied,

  • Don't refuse or walkout.
  • Attend the meeting but repeat your request for union representation.

 The role of the union representative in a Weingarten meeting:

  • Ask for time to talk in private before the meeting;  
  • Take notes & record the names, dates questions;  
  • Secure "due process" and fair treatment;  
  • Be sure that the grievant is not railroaded;  
  • Object to any attempts to anger or frighten the grievant;  
  • Call a timeout to caucus or recess as needed;  
  • Ask for questions to be rephrased or explained as necessary; 
  • Make no permanent or undo-able decisions at that interview; 
  • Right after the interview, call your union staff.

GET A WITHDRAWAL CARD!!

If you leave your job FOR ANY REASON, please contact the Local 100 office at (513) 769-5100 and

speak with Lisa (ext. 325) to get a withdrawal card.  This will stop your union dues obligation while you are not working.

Or, you may fill-out the withdrawal card request below and bring it to the Local 100 office.

The fee to obtain a withdrawal card is $0.50.

WITHDRAWAL CARD REQUEST

NAME __________________________________________________

ADDRESS _______________________________________________

PHONE # _________________    SS# (last 4 digits) _____________

EMPLOYER ______________________________________________

LAST DAY WORKED________________________________________

Did you know that labor unions made the following 36 things possible?

  1. Weekends without work
  2. All breaks at work, including your lunch breaks
  3. Paid vacation
  4. Family & Medical Leave Act (FMLA)
  5. Sick leave
  6. Social Security
  7. Minimum wage
  8. Civil Rights Act/Title VII - prohibits employer discrimination
  9. 8-hour work day
  10. Overtime pay
  11. Child labor laws
  12. Occupational Safety & Health Act (OSHA)
  13. 40-hour work week
  14. Workers' compensation (workers' comp)
  15. Unemployment insurance
  16. Pensions
  17. Workplace safety standards and regulations
  18. Employer health care insurance
  19. Collective bargaining rights for employees
  20. Wrongful termination laws
  21. Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA)
  22. Whistleblower protection laws
  23. Employee Polygraph Protection Act (EPPA) - prohibits employers from using a lie detector test on an employee
  24. Veteran's Employment and Training Services (VETS)
  25. Compensation increases and evaluations (i.e. raises)
  26. Sexual harassment laws
  27. Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA)
  28. Holiday pay
  29. Employer dental, life, and vision insurance
  30. Privacy rights
  31. Pregnancy and parental leave
  32. Military leave
  33. The right to strike
  34. Public education for children
  35. Equal Pay Acts of 1963 & 2011 - requires employers pay men and women equally for the same amount of work
  36. Laws ending sweatshops in the United States

Thank a union member by buying union-made in America products!

 
 
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