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Teamster News Headlines
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513-769-5100

 

This Week in Labor History
September 22
Emancipation Proclamation signed - 1862

Eighteen-year-old Hannah (Annie) Shapiro leads a spontaneous walkout of 17 women at a Hart Schaffner & Marx garment factory in Chicago. It grows into a months-long mass strike involving 40,000 garment workers across the city, protesting 10-hour days, bullying bosses and cuts in already-low wages - 1910
(Reviving the Strike: How Working People can Regain Power and Transform America: If the American labor movement is to rise again, the author says, it will not be as a result of electing Democrats, the passage of legislation, or improved methods of union organizing. Rather, workers will need to rediscover the power of the strike. Not the ineffectual strike of today, where employees meekly sit on picket lines waiting for scabs to take their jobs, but the type of strike capable of grinding industries to a halt—the kind employed up until the 1960s.)

Great Steel Strike begins; 350,000 workers demand union recognition. The AFL Iron and Steel Organizing Committee calls off the strike, their goal unmet, 108 days later - 1919

Martial law rescinded in Mingo County, W. Va., after police, U.S. troops and hired goons finally quell coal miners' strike - 1922

U.S. Steel announces it will cut the wages of 220,000 workers by 10 percent - 1931

United Textile Workers strike committee orders strikers back to work after 22 days out, ending what was at that point the greatest single industrial conflict in the history of American organized labor. The strike involved some 400,000 workers in New England, the mid-Atlantic states and the South - 1934

Some 400,000 coal miners strike for higher wages in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Illinois and Ohio - 1935

The AFL expels the Int’l Longshoremen's Association for racketeering; the union was readmitted to the then-AFL-CIO six years later - 1953

OSHA reaches its largest ever settlement agreement, $21 million, with BP Products North America following an explosion at BP's Texas City, Texas, plant earlier in the year that killed 15 and injured 170 - 2005

Eleven Domino's employees in Pensacola, Fla., form the nation's first union of pizza delivery drivers - 2006

San Francisco hotel workers end a 2-year contract fight, ratify a new 5-year pact with their employers - 2006

September 23
The Workingman's Advocate of Chicago publishes the first installment of The Other Side, by Martin A. Foran, president of the Coopers' Int’l Union. Believed to be the first novel by a trade union leader and some say the first working-class novel ever published in the U.S. - 1868

A coalition of Knights of Labor and trade unionists in Chicago launch the United Labor party, calling for an 8-hour day, government ownership of telegraph and telephone companies, and monetary and land reform. The party elects seven state assembly men and one senator - 1886

A 42-month strike by Steelworkers at Bayou Steel in Louisiana ends in a new contract and the ousting of scabs - 1996

California Gov. Gray Davis (D) signs legislation making the state the first to offer workers paid family leave - 2002

September 24
Canada declares the Wobblies illegal - 1918

September 25
American photographer Lewis Hine born in Oshkosh, Wisc. – 1874
(Kids at Work: Lewis Hine and the Crusade Against Child Labor: Your heart will be broken by this exceptional book’s photographs of children at backbreaking, often life-threatening work, and the accompanying commentary by author Russell Freedman. Photographer Lewis Hine–who himself died in poverty in 1940–did as much, and perhaps more, than any social critic in the early part of the 20th century to expose the abuse of children, as young as three and four, by American capitalism.)

Two African-American sharecroppers are killed during an ultimately unsuccessful cotton-pickers’ strike in Lee County, Ark.  By the time the strike had been suppressed, 15 African-Americans had died and another six had been imprisoned.  A white plantation manager was killed as well - 1891

September 26
The Old 97, a Southern Railway train officially known as the Fast Mail, derails near Danville, Va., killing engineer Joseph “Steve” Broady and ten other railroad and postal workers.  Many believe Broady had been ordered to speed to make up for lost time.  The Wreck of the Old 97 inspired balladeers; a 1924 recording is sometimes cited as the first million-selling country music record - 1903

The first production Ford Model T leaves the Piquette Plant in Detroit, Mich.  It was the first car ever manufactured on an assembly line, with interchangeable parts.  The auto industry was to become a major U.S. employer, accounting for as many as one of every eight to 10 jobs in the country - 1908

September 27
Striking textile workers in Fall River, Mass., demand bread for their starving children - 1875

The Int’l Typographical Union renews a strike against the Los Angeles Times and begins a boycott that runs intermittently from 1896 to 1908. A local anti-Times committee in 1903 persuades William Randolph Hearst to start a rival paper, the Los Angeles Examiner. Although the ITU kept up the fight into the 1920s, the Times remained totally nonunion until 2009, when the GCIU—now the Graphic Communications Conference of the Teamsters—organized the pressroom – 1893

Int’l Ladies' Garment Workers Union begins strike against Triangle Shirtwaist Co.  This would become the "Uprising of the 20,000," resulting in 339 of 352 struck firms—but not Triangle—signing agreements with the union.  The Triangle fire that killed 246 would occur less than two years later – 1909
(Triangle: The Fire that Changed America: On March 25, 1911, a fire broke out at the Triangle shirtwaist factory in New York City. Within minutes it engulfed three upper floors, burning to death—or causing to jump to their deaths—146 workers, 123 of them women, some as young as 15.)

Twenty-nine west coast ports lock out 10,500 workers in response to what management says is a worker slowdown in the midst of negotiations on a new contract.  The ports are closed for 10 days, reopen when President George W. Bush invokes the Taft-Hartley Act - 2002

September 28
The International Workingmen’s Association is founded in London.  It was an international organization trying to unite a variety of different left-wing, socialist, communist and anarchist political groups and unions.  It functioned for about 12 years, growing to a membership declared to be eight million, before being disbanded at its Philadelphia conference in 1876, victim of infighting brought on by the wide variety of members’ philosophies - 1864

—Compiled and edited by David Prosten

Copyright © 2014 Union Communication Services—Worker Institute at Cornell ILR, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you opted-in, or are a current customer.

Our mailing address is:
Union Communication Services—Worker Institute at Cornell ILR
249 Highland Ave.
Rochester, NY 14620

There have been some problems with Teamsters

losing health benefits and prescription benefits

while filing for disability and /or workers compensation.   

There is no worse time to lose you health benefits

and prescription benefits than while a member is injured or ill. 

We have been working to resolve this problem.

Welcome UPS

We have been in contact with the Teamcare people

to correct this problem.    

The attached link is a pdf version of the instructions:

http://www.teamsterslocal100.com/docs/contracts/STD_Procedures_and_Claim_Form_Combined___FINAL.pdf

These instructions outline the new procedures

to maintain benefits while filing for disability

or filing for workers compensation.   

(When filing for Workers Compensation,

you will also need to file a subrugation agreement,

agreeing to re-pay Teamcare if and when your worker's

compensation claim is approved.)

Since changing from UPS sponsored disability benefits to

Teamcare disability benefits, the procedures have changed. 

With the changes some of our brothers and sisters

have been denied disability benefits

and have been denied health benefits

and prescription benefits. 

Hopefully with these new procedures,

we have addressed these problems.

If you have any questions or issues with obtaining benefits,

please call Dave Webster, 513-769-5100 ext 319

or Sam Bucalo, 513-769-5100 ext 317

http://www.teamsterslocal100.com/docs/contracts/STD_Procedures_and_Claim_Form_Combined___FINAL.pdf

A Labor Day Message from

Teamsters General President James P. Hoffa

On the first Monday of every September, our nation honors the contributions and sacrifices of millions of working men and women. Labor Day is about remembering labor’s triumphs and the workers without whom society would not function. But it’s also about solidarity and celebrating our movement—a movement that today is alive and well and still fighting for a strong middle class.

The labor movement, and the Teamsters Union in particular, is alive and well and is still forcing change. Labor is behind the movement to raise the minimum wage and shining a spotlight on income inequality. And the Teamsters Union is still organizing new members. Many workers know that unions are the key to a better life, and Labor Day is a time to remind everyone else about that fact. That’s why the Teamsters Union has organized more than 40,000 school bus workers in the last few years; why nearly 600 paratransit drivers in Chicago and hundreds more parking workers in Boston just joined the Teamsters; why thousands of taxi drivers nationwide are forming associations with the Teamsters.

For far too many people, Labor Day is seen simply as a day of rest. But for a growing set of U.S. workers, there is no break from trying to earn enough to support their families. Despite a dip in unemployment during the past few years, low pay continues to plague many employees while their corporate bosses rake in record profits.

The roots of the American middle class' economic decline are decades in the making. Spurred by a decline in union membership, fewer manufacturing jobs and an increase in the service economy, it has gotten harder and harder for workers to make ends meet. And those changes have been exacerbated by trade deals like NAFTA that have led to more than a million lost jobs.

Improving the outlook for U.S workers isn't about creating millions of minimum-wage jobs. It is about creating sustainable, skilled employment that allows Americans to earn a fair wage with benefits that allows them to pay for housing and food on the table and sustain a middle-class lifestyle.

Corporations are increasingly looking to friendly lawmakers on the Hill who are only too happy to reduce the "burden" on billionaires while rank-and-file workers suffer. Despite being a nation that gave birth to the epic failed energy conglomerate Enron Corp. and mega-banks that drove the U.S. into a recession and threaten to do so again, for too many in Congress, there is no limit to obstacles they will hurdle for their corporate cronies.

Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for the average worker. That's why we have tobacco field workers living in squalor and getting sick and injured while working for the minimum wage in North Carolina. That's why we have fast-food workers who are victimized by successful companies allegedly stealing their wages. And it is why we have thousands of low-wage workers taking to the streets over and over again to say enough.

Hardworking Americans find themselves at a crossroads. With the November elections looming, they need to carefully consider their options to help turn the U.S. economy in a positive direction. It starts with backing candidates who place the people above the powerful.

 

It's Labor Day weekend, an opportunity for workers to relax, reflect and take pride in our accomplishments and the knowledge that we have changed our country for the better.

But it’s also a time for us to pledge our support for our brothers and sisters who are fighting tooth and nail every day just to get by, who are languishing without the good jobs and fair wages they need to support their families. In this country, someone working the minimum wage makes $290 a week. You and I both know that’s not enough to feed a family and keep a home warm in winter, let alone be able to buy your kids back-to-school supplies.

This weekend is Labor Day weekend, but Election Day is coming. We’ve got a big fight on our hands now, a fight that will determine whether workers continue to struggle or whether we can revitalize our communities that have been devastated by big banks and corporate greed.

Will we elect officials who’ll raise wages and create jobs or ones who’ll give more tax breaks to corporations and CEOs and leave workers behind?

We need to raise the standard of living in this country. We need to raise workers’ share of the fruits of our own labor because it’s not right that CEOs are the only ones profiting from our sweat. We need to raise the number of kids who go to college and the number of seniors who retire in security and comfort. We need to raise our voices. We need to roll up our sleeves and fight.

It starts with raising the minimum wage. It ends with an economy that works for everyone, not just corporations and CEOs.

It starts this weekend. It ends on Election Day, with victories for elected officials who will fight for working people every single day they're in office.

Will you join me, brothers and sisters? To fight not just for ourselves, but for all working families—and for the future of the country we love?

It’s going to be a tough fight, but you and I have never shied away from one of those before, not when workers’ lives are on the line. Let’s stand together and win this one in November.

(copied from an AFL-CIO letter sent to union leaders this weekend)



old union hall

The Next

Membership Meetings

will be

October 7th, 2014

at 7 PM


 

 

 

TEAMSTERS LOCAL 100

SUPPORTS THE

MEMBERS

OF THE BUTLER COUNTY

CHILDREN'S SERVICES

INDEPENDENT UNION.

Below is a notice sent by email this weekend

from the City of Cincinnati

Human Resources Department:

Just wanted to provide an update on the retro mass pay increase.

As you are aware, AFSCME, CODE, and Teamsters employees

received a 1.5% COLA that was implemented this pay period.

The effective date for CODE was 7/7/2013, for AFSCME it was 8/18/2013,

and for Teamsters it was 10/27/2013.

Retroactive pay was also calculated and paid using those dates.

For the retro pay, employees will see either RET,
which designates pensionable earnings,
or REN is used for non-pensionable earnings.
REN applies to overtime and is also used for any retro paid
to any employee who terminated employment prior to August 3,2014.
Some employees were temporarily promoted during this period and their
retro may not have calculated correctly if they were temporarily promoted to
a non-represented position or if they moved between D0 and D0C. 
HR is currently working to identify those individuals to ensure that the retro
calculated correctly and to correct, as needed.
HR Liaisions were advised last week to notify Lisa Berning of the employee's
name and CHRIS ID number and the Divisions affected.
We will make every effort to correct any identified errors
as quickly as possible.
Lisa Berning is te HR contact for the technical aspect of the pay increase.
Thanks very much.
For Teamster Workers at the GCWW, our next scheduled raise is
October 27, 2014. 
We have 1% raise, which is tied to all other City Bargaining Units. 
We included a "Me Too" clause, where if any other City Employees
receive a larger wage increse (larger than 1%),
we will rexceive that larger wage increase.
This year both the Firefighters Union and the Police Union
are in contract negotiations.
Neither of these groups,
representing more than 1700 City Employees,
have received a raise in about six years.

The New UPS Contract Books are HERE! 

Ask your steward or your business agent

to bring some into your work area.

Cheers to the UPS team for installing this ramp

this week for an elderly client in KY! #UPS

THE NEW UPS CONTRACT

HAS BEEN RELEASED IN PDF VERSION.  

LOCAL 100 HAS ORDERED PRINTED COPIES FROM THE IBT FOR ALL OF OUR MEMBERS, WE WILL NOTIFY THE MEMBERSHIP, WHEN THOSE COPIES ARE DELIEVRED TO THE UNION HALL. 

PLEASE DOWNLOAD THE PDF VERSION AND SHARE IT WITH YOUR UPS TEAMSTER BROTHERS AND SISTERS.

http://www.teamsterslocal100.com/docs/contracts/6161478090_master_final.pdf

http://www.teamsterslocal100.com/docs/contracts/61614_central_region_final.pdf

http://www.teamsterslocal100.com/docs/contracts/2013_2018_ups_ohiorider.pdf

UPS TEAMSTERS VOLUNTEER
TO CLEAN-UP BOTANICAL GARDEN
AT CINCINNATI ZOO
Greg Schneider reported on the good work being done by a handful of UPS Teamsters at the Cincinnati Zoo.  Pictured are Greg along with Jeff Normand and Kathleen Pepmeyer in the  Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden.

Thank you to volunteer teams from UPS, Children's Hospital, Cincinnati Zoo and Avondale Community Council for giving back and making a difference in the neighborhoods around the Zoo. Special thanks to the Cincinnati ToolBank for supplying the tools.

 

 

WEINGARTEN

 The term "Weingarten Rights" refers to a U.S. Supreme Court decision (420 US 251, 1974) which ruled that an employee has the right to a union representative in any interview the employer might hold that is intended to investigate a possible discipline charge against the employee. Often compared to the Miranda rights of criminal suspects charged by the police, there is a crucial difference: unless the union contract requires it, the employer does not have to tell the suspected employee that he or she has this right to union representation. The employee must ask for the representation!

The Weingarten Rights simply put are:

  1. The right to be informed, in advance, of the subject matter of disciplinary interviews.  

  2. The right to union representation at such an interview.

Still there is the question of what to do when these rights are violated. Normally, the rule is to follow orders and file a grievance, or in this case an unfair labor practice charge, afterward. If you are required to attend such an interview, and your request for union representation is denied, the best advice is to attend the meeting but respond to any and all questions by simply repeating your request for representation.

Remember, if your request for union representation is denied,

  • Don't refuse or walkout.
  • Attend the meeting but repeat your request for union representation.

 The role of the union representative in a Weingarten meeting:

  • Ask for time to talk in private before the meeting;  
  • Take notes & record the names, dates questions;  
  • Secure "due process" and fair treatment;  
  • Be sure that the grievant is not railroaded;  
  • Object to any attempts to anger or frighten the grievant;  
  • Call a timeout to caucus or recess as needed;  
  • Ask for questions to be rephrased or explained as necessary; 
  • Make no permanent or undo-able decisions at that interview; 
  • Right after the interview, call your union staff.

AS WE GEAR UP FOR THE 2014 MID TERM ELECTIONS AND THE OHIO GOVERNOR ELECTION. 

TEAMSTERS AND ALL UNION MEMBERS NEED TO KNOW THAT THOSE THAT WOULD BUST OUR UNIONS WILL OUT SPEND US AND TRY TO BUY THESE ELECTIONS.   WE NEED TO BE OUT-SPOKEN WITH OUR NEIGHBORS AND FAMILY MEMBERS AND GET THE VOTE OUT.

Former Secretary of Labor, Robert Reich debated a Koch-apologist yesterday who claimed America's unions funneled more into politics than the Koch brothers. Baloney. Union money at least comes from large numbers of workers seeking higher pay and better working conditions; Koch m...oney comes from two brothers seeking to entrench their power and privilege. And it's clear the Koch brothers are spending way more. In 2012, union spending (PAC, individual, outside) totaled less than $153.5 million, while Koch spending totaled $412.6 million.

Tell Congress: Stop Citizens United!

Citizens United is destroying our democracy. Since the decision, right-wing groups have spent nearly $1 billion trying to buy elections in America.

City councils all across Ohio, including Athens, Oberlin, Akron, and Cleveland Heights, have passed resolutions urging Congress to take action. They want the decision — which unleashed hundreds of millions of dollars in special interest spending in elections — reversed.

Today, you can speak out with them. Join Ed FitzGerald, sign up below to urge Congress to turn back the disastrous effects of Citizens United.

Sign this petition

GET A WITHDRAWAL CARD!!

If you leave your job FOR ANY REASON, please contact the Local 100 office at (513) 769-5100 and

speak with Lisa (ext. 325) to get a withdrawal card.  This will stop your union dues obligation while you are not working.

Or, you may fill-out the withdrawal card request below and bring it to the Local 100 office.

The fee to obtain a withdrawal card is $0.50.

WITHDRAWAL CARD REQUEST

NAME __________________________________________________

ADDRESS _______________________________________________

PHONE # _________________    SS# (last 4 digits) _____________

EMPLOYER ______________________________________________

LAST DAY WORKED________________________________________

Did you know that labor unions made the following 36 things possible?

  1. Weekends without work
  2. All breaks at work, including your lunch breaks
  3. Paid vacation
  4. Family & Medical Leave Act (FMLA)
  5. Sick leave
  6. Social Security
  7. Minimum wage
  8. Civil Rights Act/Title VII - prohibits employer discrimination
  9. 8-hour work day
  10. Overtime pay
  11. Child labor laws
  12. Occupational Safety & Health Act (OSHA)
  13. 40-hour work week
  14. Workers' compensation (workers' comp)
  15. Unemployment insurance
  16. Pensions
  17. Workplace safety standards and regulations
  18. Employer health care insurance
  19. Collective bargaining rights for employees
  20. Wrongful termination laws
  21. Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA)
  22. Whistleblower protection laws
  23. Employee Polygraph Protection Act (EPPA) - prohibits employers from using a lie detector test on an employee
  24. Veteran's Employment and Training Services (VETS)
  25. Compensation increases and evaluations (i.e. raises)
  26. Sexual harassment laws
  27. Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA)
  28. Holiday pay
  29. Employer dental, life, and vision insurance
  30. Privacy rights
  31. Pregnancy and parental leave
  32. Military leave
  33. The right to strike
  34. Public education for children
  35. Equal Pay Acts of 1963 & 2011 - requires employers pay men and women equally for the same amount of work
  36. Laws ending sweatshops in the United States

Thank a union member by buying union-made in America products!

Links to National Registration Web Page :

 
 
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